Monday, June 5, 2017

Lake St. Clair Metropark - last week of spring banding

Spring migration typically continues into the first week of June most years, so banding efforts are conducted to try to capture the latest and last migrants. This week we were able to band on two days, June 1 and 3. We had to reschedule banding on June 4 to June 3 because of rain, which is somehow a fitting end to this very wet spring season. Only 58 birds were banded on these two days, but included most of the expected late migrants and a couple of surprises. At the end of the detailed results for these two days, I have provided a general summary of the entire spring's banding results.

Highlights of the 38 species of 23 species banded on Thursday, June 1, included a Ruby-throated Hummingbird, a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, 2 Alder and 3 Willow Flycatchers. Most years at the Marsh station we captured Swainson's Thrush in the first couple days of June, and today was no exception.
After hatch-year Swainson's Thrush

















We captured the expected late migrating warblers, including American Redstart, Mourning Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, and Canada Warbler. Second-year male American Redstarts are often mistaken for females, but most will have some black on the head or especially on the face, as on this individual, which females never show.
Second-year male American Redstart
















Late migrating warblers are often females, but there were still male Wilson's Warblers in the park today indicating that more females were yet to come through.
Second-year male Wilson's Warbler

















The "necklace" on female Canada Warblers is less distinct than on males, and they have less black on their foreheads.
After second-year female Canada Warbler

















Interesting birds observed but not banded included singing Eastern Wood-Pewee, Great Crested Flycatcher, Red-eyed Vireo, Gray-cheeked Thrush, and Orchard Oriole.

Highlights of the 21 birds of 17 species banded on Saturday, June 3, included a Ruby-throated Hummingbird, the 18th of the season. The record in spring at the Marsh station was 13 in 2008. In fall we band many more hummingbirds. There were also Empidonax flycatchers in evidence today, and the only one that we banded keyed out to Alder Flycatcher.

The brownish back, white throat, very narrow (sometimes nearly absent) eye ring, and slightly grayer head will get your ID to either Willow or Alder, but in the field the bird needs to vocalize to confirm the identification. In-hand, maybe 50% of them will key out to one species or another, and there is some skepticism that they keys I(based on various measurements of specific wing feathers and bill length) are correct. Some Willow and Alder Flycatchers, including the one in this photo, show wing bars that are subtly different in color with the one on the median coverts richer buff and the one on the greater coverts paler buff.
After hatch-year Alder Flycatcher
















This Warbling Vireo was the 1300th species banded this spring. The best spring at the Marsh station was 997 banded in 2012. The presence of a brood patch allowed her to be sexed as female.
After hatch-year female Warbling Vireo

















Two Swainson's Thrushes today confirmed that their migration was not yet over.
After hatch-year Swainson's Thrush

















This Gray-cheeked Thrush was a bit of a surprise (though one was heard singing just two days ago), and is the latest ever banded in the park.
After hatch-year Gray-cheeked Thrush
















Another surprise, though not later than they occur here, was the 3rd Blackpoll Warbler of the spring. We almost never catch any of these in spring, with only one in 10 years at the Marsh station, though we averaged 17 per fall season there.
After hatch-year female Blackpoll Warbler
















After hatch-year female Blackpoll Warbler

















Interesting birds observed but not banded included a flyover Green Heron, and singing Tennessee Warbler and American Redstarts.

Perhaps a fitting final photo for this spring's banding is this Leopard Frog sitting in the middle of the net lane.
Northern Leopard Frog
















Banding could not have been done on these two days without the help of the following volunteers: John Bieganowski, Stevie Kuroda, Dave Lancaster, Bruce Watson, and Blanche Wicke.

Detailed Bird Banding Results

June 1, 2017

Time open (E.S.T.): 5:45
Time closed (E.S.T.): 12:15
Hours Open: 6.75
Sunrise (E.S.T.): 4:57
Net Hours: 73.0 (only 11.5 nets open; not enough volunteers)
Temperature (F): 55-72
Cloud Cover: 40-0%
Wind Direction: NE-SE
Wind Speed (mph): 5-7-12
Barometer: 30.08 - 30.13
Precipitation:  None
No. Banded: 38 (plus 15 recaptured)
Species Captured: 23
Capture Rate (#/100 net hours): 72.6
Banding Assistants (9.0 hours worked): John Bieganowski, Dave Lancaster. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird -1
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 1
Alder Flycatcher - 2
Willow Flycatcher - 3
Blue Jay - 1
Black-capped Chickadee - 1
Swainson's Thrush - 1
American Robin -  1
[Gray Catbird - 3 recaptured]
Cedar Waxwing - 1
Yellow Warbler - 3 (plus 5 recaptured)
American Redstart - 3
Mourning Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 4 (plus 1 recaptured)
Wilson's Warbler - 4
Canada Warbler - 1
[Song Sparrow - 1 recaptured]
[Northern Cardinal - 1 recaptured]
Red-winged Blackbird - 4 (plus 1 recaptured)
Common Grackle - 1
Brown-headed Cowbird - 1
Baltimore Oriole - 2 (plus 3 recaptured)
American Goldfinch - 2
-----------------------------------------------

June 3, 2017

Time open (E.S.T.): 5:45
Time closed (E.S.T.): 12:30
Hours Open: 6.75
Sunrise (E.S.T.):  4:57
Net Hours: 113.75
Temperature (F): 52-77
Cloud Cover: 20-0%
Wind Direction: WSW-SW
Wind Speed (mph): 1-3-7
Barometer: 30.13 - 30.13
Precipitation: None
No. Banded: 32 (plus 18 recaptured)
Species Captured: 17
Capture Rate (#/100 net hours): 34.3
Banding Assistants (8.5 hours worked): Stevie Kuroda, Bruce Watson, Blanche Wicke.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
Alder Flycatcher - 1
Warbling Vireo - 2
Tree Swallow - 1 (plus 1 recaptured)
Black-capped Chickadee - 1
[Tufted Titmouse - 1 recaptured]
Gray-cheeked Thrush - 1
Swainson's Thrush - 2
American Robin - 3
Gray Catbird - 2 (plus 2 recaptured)
Yellow Warbler - 1 (plus 9 recaptured)
Blackpoll Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 2
Canada Warbler - 1
[Song Sparrow - 1 recaptured]
Red-winged Blackbird - 1 (plus 2 recaptured)
Baltimore Oriole - 1 (plus 2 recaptured)
-----------------------------------------------

Spring 2017 Bird Banding Results

1301 individuals of 74 species banded, both records based on data from the Marsh station. Totals are shown with capture rate (number per 100 net hours) in brackets [ ], and number of returnees from previous years in parentheses. Species in bold text are considered unusual based on banding efforts at the Marsh station, but they may turn out to be more frequently captured as banding continues at this Meadow station. Additional comments are provided in italics.

Solitary Sandpiper - 1 [0.05] - Third ever in park
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 18 [0.86] - Record number
Downy Woodpecker - 6 [0.29] (+1 returnee)
(Hairy Woodpecker - 2 returnees)
Northern Flicker - 6 [0.29] - Record number
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1 [0.05]
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 4 [0.19]
Alder Flycatcher - 6 [0.29]
Willow Flycatcher - 15 [0.72] (+1 returnee) - Record number
"Traill's" Flycatcher - 16 [0.77] - Record number
Least Flycatcher - 9 [0.43] - Record number
Eastern Kingbird - 2 [0.10] - Record number
Warbling Vireo - 13 [0.62] (+4 returnees) - Record number
Philadelphia Vireo - 1 [0.05] - Tied record number
Red-eyed Vireo - 1 [0.05]
Blue Jay - 15 [0.72] - Tied record number
Tree Swallow - 16 [0.77] (+ 1 returnee) - Record number
Black-capped Chickadee - 5 [0.24] (+10 returnees)
(Tufted Titmouse - 2 returnees)
White-breasted Nuthatch - 1 [0.05]
Brown Creeper - 6 [0.29]
Carolina Wren - 1 [0.05] (+1 returnee)
House Wren - 15 [0.72] (+2 returnees) - Record number
Winter Wren - 2 [0.10]
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 18 [0.86]
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 47 [2.25] - Record number
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4 [0.19]
Veery - 15 [0.72] - Record number
Gray-cheeked Thrush - 11 [0.53] - Record number
Swainson's Thrush - 22 [1.05] - Record number
Hermit Thrush - 14 [0.67]
Wood Thrush - 2 [0.10]
American Robin - 41 [1.96] (+2 returnees)
Gray Catbird - 42 [2.01] (+ 5 returnees) - Record number
Brown Thrasher - 2 [0.10]
European Starling - 8 [0.38] (+1 returnee)
Cedar Waxwing - 8 [0.38] - Record number
Tennessee Warbler - 1 [0.05] - Tied record number
Orange-crowned Warbler - 2 [0.10]
Nashville Warbler - 6 [0.29]
Yellow Warbler - 62 [2.97] (+26 returnees)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 2 [0.10]
Magnolia Warbler - 41 [1.96] - Record number
Cape May Warbler - 1 [0.05] - First in spring
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 2 [0.10]
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 22 [1.05] - Record number
Black-throated Green Warbler - 1 [0.05]
Blackburnian Warbler - 1 [0.05]
Palm Warbler - 11 [0.53] - Record number
Blackpoll Warbler - 3 [0.14] - Record number
Black-and-white Warbler - 5 [0.24]
American Redstart - 21 [1.01] - Record number
Ovenbird - 9 [0.43]
Northern Waterthrush - 10 [0.48]
Connecticut Warbler - 1 [0.05] - 3rd in spring
Mourning Warbler - 8 [0.38] - Tied record number
Common Yellowthroat - 78 [3.73] (+2 returnees) - Record number
Wilson's Warbler - 24 [1.15] - High
Canada Warbler - 8 [0.38]
Yellow-breasted Chat - 1 [0.05] - 7th in spring, 10th ever in park
Northern Cardinal - 7 [0.34] (+7 returnees)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 3 [0.14]
American Tree Sparrow - 8 [0.38] - Low
Fox Sparrow - 1 [0.05] - Low
Song Sparrow - 40 [1.91] (+12 returnees) - Record spring number
Lincoln's Sparrow - 32 [1.53] - High
Swamp Sparrow - 21 [1.01]
White-throated Sparrow - 29 [1.39] - Low
White-crowned Sparrow - 2 [0.10]
Dark-eyed Junco - 1 [0.05] - Low
Red-winged Blackbird - 263 [12.59] (+22 returnees) - Record number
Common Grackle - 13 [0.62]
Brown-headed Cowbird - 13 [0.62] (+2 returnees) - Record number
Orchard Oriole - 2 [0.10] - 2nd and 3rd ever in park
Baltimore Oriole - 23 [1.10] (+4 returnees)
House Finch - 2 [0.10]
American Goldfinch - 118 [5.65] (+7 returnees) - Record spring number
House Sparrow - 9 [0.43] - Record number

2 comments:

online cv writer said...

All the birds are looking beautiful and we can see the beauty of nature in the form of these mesmerizing birds. God has created these birds and animals, because our creator is also beautiful.

blogger online said...


Hummingbirds are the smallest bird that belongs from America. The name of the bird is because of its wings flapping speed that produces the humming sound. It is about 50 to 80 times per second.

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